Artificial intelligence on urban tree species identification 人工智能在市区树种识别上的应用

It doesn’t matter which part of the world you are living now,  very diverse tree species are planted around the urban area we live.  Trees in the urban areas have many functions, for example, trees provide habitats for wildlife, clean air and water, provide significant health and social benefits, and also improve property value too.  Wake up in a beautiful morning that birds are singing outside your apartment because you have many beautiful trees grow outside of your space. How awesome is that!

However, tree planting, survey, and species identification require an enormous amount of work that literally took generations and years of inputs and care. What if we could identify tree species from satellite imagery, how much faster and how well we could get tree species identified and also tell their geolocations as well.

A city has its own tree selection and planting plan, but homeowners have their own tree preference, which the identification work a bit complicated, though.

chicagoTrees

(Photo from Google Earth Pro June 2010 in Chicago area)

It’s hard to tell now how many tree species are planted in above image. But we could (zoom in and) tell these trees actually have a slightly different shape of tree crown, color, and texture. From here I only need to have a valid dataset basically tell me what tree I am looking at now, which is a tree survey and trees geolocation records from the city. I will be able to teach a computer to select similar features for the species I’m interested in identifying.

GreeAsh

These are Green Ash trees (I marked as green dots here).

LittleleafLiden.png

These are Littleleaf Linden, they are marked as orange dots.

Let me run a Caffe deep learning model (it’s one of the neural networks and also known as artificial intelligence model) for an image classification on these two species, and see if the computer could separate these two species from my training and test datasets.

Great news that the model could actually tell the differences between these two species. I run the model for 300 epochs (runs) from learning rate 0.01 to 0.001 on about 200 images for two species. 75% went to train the model and 25% for testing. The result is not bad that we have around 90% of accuracy (orange line) and less than 0.1 loss on the training dataset.

nvidia_d_modeltest

I threw a random test image to the model (a green ash screenshot in this case) and it tells the result.

test_trees2

I will be working on identifying other 20 trees species and their geolocations next time.

Let’s get some answer what trees are planted in Chicago area and how it related to the property value (an interesting question to ask), and also what ecological benefits and functions these tree are providing (leave this to urban ecologist if my cloud computer could identify the species)? Check my future work ;-).

 

PV Solar Installation in US: who has installed solar panel and who will be the next?

Project idea

Photovoltaic (PV) solar panels, which convert solar energy into electricity, are one of the most attractive options for the homeowners. Studies have shown that by 2015, there are about 4.8million homeowners had installed solar panels in the United States of America. Meanwhile, the solar energy market continues growing rapidly. Indeed, the estimated cost and potential saving of solar is the most concerned question. However, there is a tremendous commercial potential for the solar energy business, and visualizing the long term tendency of the market is vital for the solar energy companies’ survival in the market . The visualization process could be realized by examining the following aspects:

  1. Who has installed PV panels, and what are the characteristics of the household, e.g. what’s the age, household income, education level, current utility rate, race, home location, current PV resource, existing incentive and tax credits for those that have installed PV panels?
  2. What does the pattern of solar panel installation looks like across the nation, and at what rate? Which household is the most likely to install solar panels in the future?

The expected primary output from this proposal is a web map application . It will contain two major functions. The first is the cost and returned benefit for the households according to their home geolocation. The second is interactive maps for the companies of the geolocations of their future customers and the growth trends.

Initial outputs


The cost and payback period for the PV solar installation: Why not go solar!

NetCost

Incentive programs and tax credits bring down the cost of solar panel installation. This is the average costs for each state.

Monthly Saving

Going solar would save homeowners’ spending on the electricity bill.

Payback Years

Payback years vary from state to state, depending on incentives and costs. High cost does not necessarily mean a longer payback period because it also depends on the state’s current electricity rate and state subsidy/incentive schemes. The higher the current electricity rate, the sooner you would recoup the costs of solar panel installation. The higher the incentives from the state, the sooner you will recoup the installation cost.

How many PV panels have been installed and where?

Number of Solar Installation

The number of solar panels installed in the states that have been registered on NREL’s Open PV Project. There were about 500,000 installations I was able to collect from the Open PV Project. It’s zip-code-based data, so I’ve been able to merge it to the “zip code” package on R. My R codes file is added here at my GitHub project.

Other statistical facts : American homeowners who installed solar panels generally has $25,301.5higher household income compare to the national household income. Their home located in places that have higher electricity rate, about 4 cents/kW greater than the national average, and they are also having higher solar energy resource, about 1.42 kW/m2 higher than the national average.

Two interactive maps were produced in RStudio with “leaflet”

Solar Installation_screen shot1

An overview of the solar panel installation in the United States.

Solar Installation_screen shot2

Residents on the West Coast have installed about 32,000 solar panels from the data registered on the Open PV Project, and most of them were installed by residents in California. When zoomed in closely, one could easily browse through the details of the installation locations around San Francisco.

Solar Installation_screen shot3

Another good location would be The District of Columbia (Washington D.C.) area. The East Coast has less solar energy resource (kW/m2) compared to the West Coast, especially California. However, the solar panel installations of homeowners around DC area are very high too. From maps above, we know that because the cost of installation is much lower, and the payback period is much faster compared to other parts of the country. It would be fascinating to dig out more information/factors behind their installation motivation. We could zoom in too much more detailed locations for each installation on this interactive map.

However, some areas, like DC and San Francisco, have a much larger population compared to other parts of US, which means there are going to be much more installations. An installation rate per 10,000 people would be much more appropriate. Therefore, I produced another interactive map with the installation rate per 10,000 people, the bigger the size of the circle is the higher rate of the installation.

Solar Installation_screen shot4

The largest installation rate in the country is in the city of Ladera Ranch, located in South Orange County, California. Though, the reason behind it is not clear and more analysis is needed.

Solar Installation_screen shot5

Buckland, MA has the highest installation on the East Coast. I can’t explain what the motivation behind it yet either. Further analysis of the household characteristics would be helpful. These two interactive maps were uploaded tomy GitHub repository, where you will be able to see the R code I wrote to process the data as well.

Public Data Sources

To answer these two questions, datasets of 1670M (1.67G) were downloaded and scraped from multiple sources:
(1). Electricity rate by zip codes;

(2). A 10km resolution of solar energy resources map, in ESRI shapefile, was downloaded the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); It was later extracted by zipcode polygon downloaded from ESRI ArcGIS online.

(3). Current solar panel installation data was scraped from the website of open PV website, a collection of installations by zip code. It requires registration to be able to access the data. It is part of NREL. The dataset includes the zip code of the installation, the cost, the size of the installation and the state of each location.

(4). Household income, education, the population of each zip code was obtained from US census.

(5). The average cost of the solar installation for each state was scraped from the website: Current cost of solar panels and Why Solar Energy? More of datasets for this proposal will be downloaded from the Department of Energy on GitHub via API.

Note: I cannot guarantee the accuracy of the analysis. My results are based on two days of data mining, wrangling, and analysis. The quality of the analysis is highly depended on the quality of the data and on how I understood the datasets in such limited time. A further validation of the analysis and datasets is needed.

For further contact the author, please find me on https://geoyi.org; or email me:geospatialanalystyi@gmail.com.

My web map application is online

Hi friends,

I’ve been working on a web application for Chinese Ministry of Commerce on rubber cultivation and risks will be out soon, and I just wanna share with you the simplified version web map API here. I only have layers here, though, more to come.

Screen shot for web map application

Web map application by Zhuangfang Yi: Current rubber cultivation area (ha) in tropical Asia

This web map API aims to tell the investors that rubber cultivation is not just about clearing the land/forests, plant trees and then you could wait for tapping the tree and sell the latex. There are way more risks for the planting/cultivate rubber trees, including several natural disasters, cultural and economic conflicts between the foreign investors and host countries.

We also found the minimum price for rubber latex for livelihood sustainability is as high as 3USD/kg. I define the  minimum price is the price that an investor/household could cover the costs of establishing and managing their rubber plantations. While the actual rubber price is lower than the minimum price, there is no profit for having the rubber plantations. The minimum price for running a rubber plantation varies from country to country. I ran the analysis through 8 countries in Asia: China, Laos, Myanmar, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia and Indonesia. The minimum price depends on the minimum wage, labour availability, costs of the plantation establishments and management, average rubber latex productivity throughout the life span of rubber trees. The cut-off price ranges from 1.2USD/kg to 3.6USD/kg.

We could make an example that if rubber price is 2USD/kg now in the market, the country whose cutoff price for rubber is 3USD/kg won’t make any profit, but the investors in the country might lose at least 1USD/kg for selling every kg of rubber latex.