A time series Stock API development with Python Bokeh and Flask to Heroku

My final API looks like this:


You could search the stock here on my API link: http://zhuangfangyistockapp.herokuapp.com/index

If you’re interested in looking for more ticker symbols for company stock, you could go here.

For example, if you wanna search the ticker code for a company, using “B” instead of Barnes for Barnes Group. It has to be entered an upper case symbol code like the following table:


It’s not a most beautiful and amazing APP, but through hours of coding in Python just make me appreciated how much work and how amazing like Ameritrade is. Making an online data visualization tool is not an easy job, especially when you wanna render data from another sites or database.

To be honest, I would have made a better looking and searching engine with Shiny R in more efficient way, but since this API is my milestone project with The Data Incubator (even before the program is started on Jun. 19, 2017 ), and we are only allowed to use Flask, Bokeh, and Jinja with Python, and deploy the API to Heroku.  Here we go, this is the note that would help you or remind me later when I need to develop another API using Python.

First, go to Quandl.com to register an API key, since the API will render data from Quandl.

Second, know how to request Data from Quandl.com. You could render data: 1) using Request library or simplejson to request JSON dataset from Quandl; 2) you could use quandl python library.  I requested data using the quandl library because it’s much easy to use.

Third, to develop a Flask framework that could plot dataset from user’s ticker input. See the following Flask framework:

from flask import Flask, render_template,request,redirect
import quandl as Qd
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import os
import time
from bokeh.io import curdocfrom bokeh.layouts import row, column, gridplot
from bokeh.models import ColumnDataSource
from bokeh.models.widgets import PreText, Select
from bokeh.plotting import figure, show, output_file
from bokeh.embed import components,file_html
from os.path import dirname, join
app = Flask(__name__)
###Load data from Quandl
# Here define your dateframe
@app.route("/plot", methods=['GET','POST'])    
# Here define the plot you plot.#e.g
def plot():
###### load dataframe and plot it out plot = create_figure(mydata, current_feature_name);
script, div = components(plot)
return render_template('Plot.html', script=script, div=div)

@app.route('/', methods=['GET','POST'])
def main():
return redirect('/plot')
if __name__== "__main__":
app.run(port=33508, debug = True)

Fourth, make your Flask APP worked on your local computer, I mean it should look exactly like above API before I deployed to Heroku.My local API directory and files are organized in this way:


app.py is the main python code that renders data from Quandl, plot the data with Bokeh, and bound it with Flask framework to deploy to Heroku.

Fifth, Push everything above to a Github repository, using Git-CLI command lines:

git init
git add .
git commit -m 'initial commit'
heroku login
heroku create ###Name of you app/web
git push heroku master

The last but not the least, in case you wanna edit your Python code or other files to update your Heroku API. You could again do:

###update heroku app from github
heroku login
heroku git:clone -a <your app name>
cd <your app name>
#make changes here and then follow next step to push the changes to heroku
git remote add <your git repository name> https://github.com/<your git username>/<your git repository name>
git git fetch <your git repository name> master
git reset --hard <your git repository name>/master
git push heroku master --force

Other reads might be helpful here:

  1.  Bokeh and Flask API blog;
  2. and how to deploy python Heroku API.


Yeah ~ I will be with The Data Incubator (an awesome data science fellowship program) this summer

Two weeks ago, I found out I was ranked at top 2% of all applicants and was selected to join the Data Science Fellowship Program with The Data Incubator (TDI), I was so thrilled. I applied it once around Aug. last year, and only went through the semi-finalist and did not get a chance to go further. I reapplied it again around April this year and found out I was in their semi-finalist again right before Ben and I flew to South Africa to meet our good friends for a rock climbing trip.

Let me give you a bit info about TDI data science fellowship program first. It is “an intensive eight-week bootcamp that prepares the best science and engineering PhDs and Masters to work as data scientists and quants. It identifies Fellows who already have the 90% difficult-to-learn skills and equips them with the last 10%”.  The applicant went through three ‘selections’. You apply through their website (here), and the qualified semifinalists are identified by TDI. Then all the semifinalists are in computer programming, math & statistics, and modeling skill test. For this stage, TDI further identifies finalists through semifinalists’ programming, problem-solving skills for real-world problems. As a finalist, you will be interviewed for the data science communication skills with other finalists, and TDI team will decide if you get in the program a week after the interview. About 25% of applicants (~2000 applicants) are selected as semifinalists and 3% are selected as fellows and scholars. See the figure I made bellow (this is only according to the best knowledge I have for the program).

Fellowship Program

Back to my story ;-). Since we were actually at Rockland, South Africa to start our exciting bouldering journey. I was pretty disappointed about giving up 2 or 3 days out of 8 days of our vacation for the programming, problem-solving test. In addition to that, I have to propose and build an independent data science project. I thought about just postponing or canceling my semifinalist opportunity, and enjoyed the vacation because our wifi was so spotty at the rural South Africa anyway. But I’m glad I did not just give it up. It literally took me 7 or 8 hours in our guest house there to download a 220M dataset from TDI for the test. I was thinking about using my Amazon cloud computer for my independent project, but the internet wasn’t very helpful.


I basically only used the wifi and uploaded my files and answers while everyone left the guest house for their rock climbings, and the best spot for wifi was in our bathroom, lol~~~ uploading a 15M file took me about four hours with multiple fails. LOL…

Luckily, things worked out, and I can’t wait to join TDI’s summer fellow cohort. I’m super excited about learning more advanced machine learning, distributed computing (Spark, Hadoop and MapeReduce) with the smart data brains fellows.

Wish me luck!!!

Some pictures of Ben, Pete, me and our other friends’ rock climbing pictures here, and let’s rock through our 2017.


Photo Credits: Ben ;-).



Pete got me(the tiny green bug on the rock ;-)) climbing up a wall at Cape Town local climb.

This basically our best vacation so far, and I am glad I made it through TDI and was able to enjoy the climbing after the test. Our friends Pete and Corlie arranged the whole trip and we’re glad we made all the way to the amazingly beautiful South Africa.